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, is the economy strong enough, corporations strong enough to stand on their own? fed is not going to pull the plug hon this any time soon, but the noises are out there. it's already spooky the market. once the fed is no longer juicing up this market, is there enough out there that's strong enough to keep it going? >> i really don't think that the fed is going to take any chances with what is so far a very tentative recovery. they know we'll already have quite a bit of fiscal tightening in 2013. we've got the sequestration that's almost certain to take effect, already had some pretty big tax increases. i can't see bernanke and janet yellin taking a risk with a premature taking away of the punch bowl but policy change in the rate overseas. europe and japan are looking much better i think in terms of the change in policy than the u.s., and i think the outperformance that we saw in the last part of last year can take hold again this year. >> yeah. allen gale, are you paid to put money to work, got to put some money to work or even if this market is going to see a correction of some kind. where would y
the united states and greece. first, we're a huge diversified economy, not a little country dependant on tourism. secondly, people in the u.s. pay their taxes, you know. greece had a deficit of about 7% of gdp. that would be over $1 trillion a year in the united states before the collapse. we have a very different story. the third is a huge difference. we have our own currency. greece is like arkansas. the reason why its interest rates went through the roof. everyone thought that. >> i think the point he was trying to make in that that if we don't do something about this the market will figure out that we have a credit problem in the country. >> the markets are smarter than that. >> when you normalize interest rates, right now they are really manipulated, if you normalize interest rates, you're talking about $500 billion going out the door every year just on interest expen expense. that's just paying the interest on the debt. you think that's sustainable? >> that's a lower interest expense than what we had relative to our economy in the early '90s. we could live with that. we lived wi
again in that area, and then at some point getting towards the summer, if the economy continues to grow, this market is going to move a lot higher from there. i'm a buyer, still a buyer at these lofty levels. >> went through an entire hour without mentioning the "s" word that everybody hates in washington, sequestration, right? >> yes. >> that's coming up march 1st. soon after that a big jobs number coming up, and tomorrow live economic data. >> oh, yeah. >> that could move this market one way or another. >> as the economic data moves, it doesn't move it long term but short term. if the numbers don't come in where we want and the fed comes out with some statement tomorrow afternoon looking to maybe curtail that buying program. there's a lot of things that come out, but i still think they will be short-term moves. >> the market will ignore the bad news and embrace the good news. how cool is clive davis? >> besides warren buffett the only other legend i would shake hands with on the trading floor. >> and we were all thrilled to do that. his book is called "the soundtrack of my life" out t
as holdings elsewhere outside, the teal in china, et cetera, what does it say about the global economy? >> we see everything for our business. it's continuing to do okay. you know. we have a big operation in japan. we're still doing reasonably okay in japan. china's a great growth opportunity as you saw for us. looking at brazil and other countries like that, and the u.s. market also is a good market so, you know, don't count out the u.s., so we're here. we've got to figure out some of the issues with product which we have. peter hancock has done an excellent job of bringing risk management into the u.s. marketplace so we're pretty comfortable we'll see growth around the world, and the economies so far have not really dramatically affected our business. >> bob benmosche, nice to have you on the program. >> thanks you. >> president and ceo of aing a. >>> up next, bob pisani and up next a u.s. executive calls french executives lazy. how about that. this is real, folks. he's got up in a public battle with the french. stay with us. you won't want to miss that. ss? at fidelity, we do it by merging
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